Leek and Bacon Quiche in Potato Crust: Emeril’s One-Pot Cooking Party

The opening of Sizzling Sillets: A message from Emeril

OK, so I’ll admit it — with going out of town for my birthday and looming writing deadlines, my Emeril Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders posts have been lagging. With all of the prep required in most of these dishes and/or lengthy cooking times, it’s been hard to get all my posts in BUT fear not, I found a solution!

Simplify.

For all you busy working moms out there, that want to cook these delicious dishes but maybe don’t have the time necessary to execute the big and fancy versions of Emeril’s dishes, I say don’t give up — simplify. So today, though I cannot give you Emeril’s recipe (you’ll need to order the book — available now at your local bookseller) I can tell you how I used his ingredients (well, most of them) and tweaked his recipe a bit to suit my needs.

Doesn't it look yummy?

I love a good quiche or frittata for dinner with a nice peppery arugula salad so  I had chosen to cook up Emeril’s  Leek and Bacon Quiche in a Potato Crust (on page 93) and purchased all the requisite ingredients early in the day (or rather sent the hubby/personal assistant to the store to gather the ingredients) but then, as always — life happened. Clients called with issues, editors emailed with last minute rush deadlines (a good freelancer never turns down work!) and before I knew it — it was 7pm and I still need to cook dinner. Since my little one has an 8pm bedtime — this posed a problem — but not for long.

Inspired by Emeril ~ The Bacon, Leek Quiche-Frittata

While a quiche is delightfully more fluffy and light and a bit more uptown than a frittata — I get just as much satisfaction from eating a frittata as I do quiche and let’s face it, folks, most of us are a bit more downtown or east of town than uptown. (HA!) So I adapted Mr. Lagasse’s recipe to suit me, by employing a few easy steps:

  • First, quiche takes so long to cook because it is essentially a custard — which means a considerable amount more liquid than a frittata (some frittata’s are made with only egg and no other liquid.) In order to cut the cooking time, I cut the milk, cream and sour cream down to a simple 1/8 cup of cream to 7 eggs.
  • Next, since I would be making this in a deep dish skillet instead of a spring-form pan and would therefore be unable to fully execute the potato crust ~ I cut the amount of potatoes in half from 2 pds to 1 pd.
  • Then, with red potatoes, freshly scrubbed and skin on, I popped them in the processor on grate and in seconds had shredded potatoes suitable for hashbrowns. I did this and hand cut the leek and Thyme leaves, while broiling the bacon in the oven and blending the eggs, cream and salt and pepper in the blender.
  • Next, I heated the skillet with oil and added the potatoes frying them crisp, so that they would stand up to the wetness of the egg during the cooking process and still allow me a semblance of a crust.
  • Pulled the crisp bacon from the oven, added the leeks to a saute pan with butter until soft, while turning the potatoes to ensure crispness on both sides.
  • With the bacon and leeks cool, I added them to the egg mixture, arranged the crisp potatoes to cover the bottom and a bit of the sides of the pan and slowly poured in the mixture to the pan, so as not to disturb the layout of crispy potatoes.
  • After the egg mixture began to set a bit on the bottom (4 to 5 minutes) I popped the whole thing into the oven on broil for 2 to 3 minutes, watching it carefully. As it puffed, but before it turned golden, I topped with 3 oz of grated white cheddar cheese and gave it another minute under the broiler.
  • Removing the golden delight from the oven let it rest for a few minutes and then cut and top with fresh sliced green onions, a dollop of sour cream or yogurt and salsa, if you like. I served it all with greens and a balsamic vinaigrette.

Voila! By 7:30pm we were eating a scrummy and satisfying (even for a 3 yr old) dinner and by 8pm my little one was safely tucked in bed dreaming of the day’s adventures.

Moral of the story ~ Don’t give up on cooking for your family ~ there’s always a way to simplify!

Happy Eating!

Wanna Win Emeril’s new cookbook? Only 2 Days left to Enter!

GIVEAWAY: Emeril Sizzling Skillets and One-Pot Wonder

SizzlingSkillets & other One-Pot Wonders jacket cover Hi-ResHere it is, what you’ve all been waiting for — how to get your hands on Emeril’s new book (if you want to guarantee you get it, head on over to pre-order it for yourself). To win your free copy, comment below telling me which of the Emeril recipes GroovyFoody has previewed that you just can’t wait to make! To increase your odds of winning — get a second entry by tweeting the link to this post and posting the link in the comments section below. Wanna stack the deck in your favor? Check out the other 19 Emeril One-Pot Party Bloggers (listed above or to the right) and enter to win on their sites as well.

That’s all there is to it.

Winner will be chosen by random drawing by my precocious 3 year old. Contest is open to US residents only, and but HURRY the contest will only be open from now through midnight, pacific time, October 1.

Full disclosure: For my commitment to this blogger cooking party, I received a copy of this cookbook, as well as a set of Emeril – by zak! Table Art 7-piece Flame-Shaped Serving Bowls, and Emeril Seasoning; a $50 grocery reimbursement and Emeril cookbooks upon completion of the party. The top performing blogger, as selected by T-Fal, will be awarded an Emeril by T-Fal Slow Cooker.

Emeril’s Sizzling Skillets: A Quiz, A Recipe — A Giveaway!

Emeril Lagasse, American celebrity chef, resta...

Image via Wikipedia

We’re in the final week of the Emeril One-Pot Cooking Party over here, folks and if you haven’t had the chance yet to make it over to some of my fellow bloggers in the party, then you should scoot on over and increase your chances to win Emeril’s new cookbook, Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders , which goes on sale tomorrow! (SEE Contest Rules and “How to Enter” below.)

In this final week, I still have many posts to get to you all. I have been cooking up a storm but behind on posting due to my 40th birthday, which took me on an out-of-town adventure that made me feel 20 again! (Thanks to that hubby of mine!)

As we’ve been cooking our way through Emeril’s dishes some of the other bloggers and I have become rather chummy, because well, what’s not to like about a fellow foodie! There are 20 of us in all and I encourage you to make your way around to all of us but a few of us have really stuck by each other throughout this one-pot journey.

Some of my new favs include:

Wanna test your Emeril knowledge? Check out this quiz:

A Sizzling Quiz with Chef Emeril Lagasse

Here’s another new Emeril recipe that I can share! (Thanks to Morrow for allowing us to pre-release a few of these recipes.)

Wok-Seared Duck Salad photo courtesy of William Morrow

Wok-Seared Duck Salad

This recipe was inspired by a Thai dish called laap, which is made with minced or ground chicken, fish, pork, or duck and seasoned with the wonderful flavors of chiles, ginger, fish sauce, and citrus. I decided to use the same flavors with a seared duck breast and make it into more of a main-course salad. This is a refreshing take on northern Thai street food.
2 tablespoons uncooked jasmine rice
1 tablespoon minced fresh red Thai bird chile
2 magret duck breasts (about 12 ounces each) or 1 ½ pounds other domestic duck breasts
1/3 cup minced shallot
1 ½ tablespoons peeled and minced fresh ginger
¼ cup fish sauce (see page 213)
¼ cup freshly squeezed lime juice
¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1 ½ teaspoons palm sugar or light brown sugar
½ cup fresh cilantro leaves
½ cup fresh mint leaves
½ cup fresh basil leaves
1 medium head of red leaf lettuce, washed and torn into bite-sized pieces
2 cups bean sprouts
1 cup julienned red bell pepper
1. Heat a wok over medium-high heat and add the rice. Toast the rice, shaking the wok constantly, until all the grains have turned golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer the rice to a mortar and set aside to cool. Once the rice has cooled, grind it using a pestle until it reaches a sandy consistency. Alternatively, grind the toasted rice in a clean spice grinder. Place the rice in a large mixing bowl and set aside.
2. Place the chile in the wok over medium-high heat and cook, shaking the wok, until lightly colored and fragrant, 30 to 60 seconds. Remove the chile from the pan and add to the bowl with the rice.
3. Using a paring knife, score the fatty side of the duck breasts by making shallow cuts in a diamond pattern; this allows the fat to render more easily. Place the duck breasts in the wok, fatty side down, and cook over medium heat until the skin is golden brown and slightly crisp, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer the duck breasts to a cutting board, slice them into thin strips, and return the strips to the wok. Add the shallot and ginger and stir-fry over medium-high heat until the duck is just cooked through, about 2 minutes. Transfer the duck from the wok to the bowl with the rice and chile and set aside.
4. In a small bowl, combine the fish sauce, lime juice, orange juice, and palm sugar and mix well. Pour the mixture over the duck and toss until well coated. Add the cilantro, mint, basil, lettuce, bean sprouts, and julienned red pepper and toss to combine.
5. Serve the salad immediately.
4 servings

SizzlingSkillets & other On-Pot Wonders jacket cover Hi-Res

Emeril’s Cookbook Giveaway!

Here it is, what you’ve all been waiting for — how to get your hands on Emeril’s new book (if you want to guarantee you get it, head on over to pre-order it for yourself). To win your free copy, comment below telling me which of the Emeril recipes GroovyFoody has previewed that you just can’t wait to make! To increase your odds of winning — get a second entry by tweeting the link to this post and posting the link in the comments section below. Wanna stack the deck in your favor? Check out the other 19 Emeril One-Pot Party Bloggers (listed above or to the right) and enter to win on their sites as well.

That’s all there is to it.

Winner will be chosen by random drawing by my precocious 3 year old. Contest is open to US residents only, and will be open from now through midnight, pacific time,  October 1.

Full disclosure: For my commitment to this blogger cooking party, I received a copy of this cookbook, as well as a set of Emeril – by zak! Table Art 7-piece Flame-Shaped Serving Bowls, and Emeril Seasoning; a $50 grocery reimbursement and Emeril cookbooks upon completion of the party. The top performing blogger, as selected by T-Fal, will be awarded an Emeril by T-Fal Slow Cooker. 

One-Pot Wonders: Tuscan White Bean Soup with Broccoli Rabe


I am a sucker for Italian cooking. My childhood memories are filled with sensory impressions like: the rich bubble of homemade marinara sauce simmering on the stove; the sweetly-savory, herby scents of garlic, oregano, basil and fennel seed filling our home; a golden crust of melted mozzarella draped luxuriously over the lip of a pan of fresh-from-the-oven lasagna. My mother’s love for all things Italian, was unequaled and many times we found her happily munching away on cold pizza for breakfast or leftover spaghetti.

My parents were not Italian and though they had experienced travel outside of the US, it was not to Italy but instead Germany, where my father was stationed as a border guard, back in the days of East and West Germany and “The Wall”. My mother, had a love of cooking and a natural inclination towards exploration in the kitchen but the times were different. The amount of information they had about world cuisine back then was not what it is today, nor was the availability of ingredients. I scarcely think my mother would have been able to find or have known what broccoli rabe was in those days.

Fresh broccoli rabe

But had she been exposed to Tuscan White Bean Soup with Broccoli Rabe, featured in Emeril’s,  Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders , I’d like to think that, maybe, she would have made this a hearty alternative to the giant pot of pinto beans topped with tomato sauce and served with the ($0.15 a box) Jiffy cornbread mix that we ate regularly, during the lean years.

For me, the most memorable version of  a Tuscan white bean soup I’ve ever tasted, was at a little mom and pop Ristorante in Siena, Italy called La Circe. Twice-cooked, is how they described their richly-flavored cannelini bean stew with tender wilted greens. Occasionally, when I make the dish at home, I will sometimes add mild Italian sausage, prosciutto or even leftover bacon grease to the mirepoix — the extra flavor bump lets this busy working mom reduce the cooking time, without skimping on richness or taste.

Emeril’s version uses baby lima beans because he says, “we just love their tender, creamy consistency.” You can use whichever white beans are your favorites or that you happen to have on hand, but as Emeril notes, “the cooking time will vary slightly.” So without further ado — here is the first of the three Emeril recipes that “The Cooking Party Bloggers” are able to preview exclusively to our readers:

Tuscan White Bean Soup with Broccoli Rabe Courtesy of Morrow

RECIPE: Tuscan White Bean Soup with Broccoli Rabe

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups small-diced onion
1 cup small-diced celery
1 cup small-diced red bell pepper
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon dried Italian herbs
¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper
8 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium chicken broth
2 pounds dried white beans (cannellini, baby lima, or great Northern), rinsed, picked over, soaked overnight, and drained
1 piece Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese rind, about 1 × 3 inches
1 bay leaf
4 cups water
1 ½ pounds broccoli rabe, tough stem ends trimmed, chopped into bite-sized pieces
1 sprig fresh rosemary
Grated zest of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
6 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, finely grated (about 1 ½ cups)
Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling

1. Heat the olive oil in an 8-quart soup pot or stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, celery, bell pepper, 1 teaspoon of the salt, and ¼ teaspoon of the black pepper and cook, stirring, until the vegetables are tender, about 6 minutes. Add the garlic, dried Italian herbs, and crushed red pepper and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the stock, beans, Parmesan rind, bay leaf, and water and bring to a low boil. Reduce the heat to simmer gently and cook, partially covered and stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender, 45 to 60 minutes.

2. Using a slotted spoon, transfer about 1 cup of the beans from the pot to a small bowl and mash them with the back of a spoon. Return the mashed beans to the soup and add the remaining 1 tablespoon salt. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and continue to cook, uncovered, until the broth thickens slightly, about 15 minutes. Add the remaining black pepper, the broccoli rabe, and rosemary sprig and continue to cook until the broccoli rabe is just tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the lemon zest and lemon juice. Remove the Parmesan rind, bay leaf, and rosemary sprig and discard them. Serve the soup in wide, shallow bowls, garnished with grated Parmesan and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil.

 

Don’t forget! Enter to win 7pc set of Emeril by Zak! Flame serving bowls

The winner will be chosen at random and announced next Friday here on the blog!

Artichoke Soup with Poached Oysters: One-Pot Wonders

Oysters and artichokes — I’m a crazy about them both. So imagine my delight when I opened Emeril’s New cookbook,  Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders and found a recipe whose ingredient list contained, not only, those two favorites but mascarpone, shallots, dry white wine, butter and cream — sinful!

Very large oysters cut in half (and this is only half of what the recipes calls for!)

“O Oysters,” said the Carpenter,
“You’ve had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?’
But answer came there none–
And this was scarcely odd, because
They’d eaten every one.
 
Lewis Carroll, The Walrus and the Carpenter
(from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872)

 

According to the rules of Emeril’s cookbook launch none of us previewers are allowed to give you the recipes (the cookbook is available for presale now!) But I will give you a few preview pics, a tease of ingredients and a bit of poetry to whet the appetite — for what is sexier than oysters, artichokes, cream, wine and poetry.

 

Artichoke hearts await

The artichoke
With a tender heart
Dressed up like a warrior,
Standing at attention, it built
A small helmet
Under its scales
It remained
Unshakeable,

Pablo Neruda, Ode to an Artichoke

 

Pssst. . .Wanna Win a 7 pc set of Emeril by Zak! Flame serving bowls

 

IN OTHER NEWS:

Know what goes great with soup? Popovers — but not just any popovers, smoked Gruyere popovers. I make mine quick and simple by using a basic choux pastry recipe and stirring in the grated cheese of my choice, once the batter is mixed. Then spoon out 1/4 cup fulls onto an ungreased cookie sheet —  25 minutes later, you have light, cheesy perfection!

My Choux Pastry Recipe

1 cup water

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter

1 cup flour

4 eggs

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Heat water and butter in a saucepan, once the butter has melted add your flour, stirring vigorously over low heat or until mixture forms a ball. Remove from heat. Beat in eggs all at once, beating until smooth. Drop by scant 1/4 cup fulls onto an ungreased cookie sheet for 25 to 30 minutes, unitl golden and cooked through. Cool away from draft. Serve while warm.

Happy Eating!